Summertime in Galileo’s World

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Some children are getting ready to watch an introductory video to the exhibit in our theater.

The summer is a great time for visitors of all ages to experience Galileo’s World in Bizzell Memorial Library. Visitors may drop by unannounced and do a self-guided tour through the exhibit, enjoying the rare books on display as well as the various hands-on activities integrated into the exhibit. There are also iPads available for visitors which will guide individuals through a book-by-book tour of the exhibit.

 

One of the educators leads a group through an activity with the inclined plane replica.

One of the educators leads a group through an activity with the inclined plane replica.

The summer is also a great time for camps to come to the exhibit. Over the past few weeks we have had multiple K-12 STEM Camps come to the exhibit as well as an architecture camp. Both groups were able to schedule their tours in advance, and as a result we were able to highlight the books from the exhibit that best fit with their particular emphases as well as select key activities that would enrich their experience.

 

Students explored the way Galileo's telescope worked through a lens activity.

Students explore the way Galileo’s telescope worked through a lens activity.

We had a lot of fun showing the students some of the treasures from the History of Science Collections as well as doing some of the hands-on activities with them.

If you are involved with school-aged children over the summer and are interested in scheduling a visit, contact Barbara Niccum (bniccum@ou.edu). We’ll work with you to select the emphasis and material that will best fit your group.

Docents are able to utilize the classroom beside the exhibit hall for groups requesting more detail on a particular topic. In this photo one of the educators explains the significance of Galileo's published observations of the moon.

Docents are able to utilize the classroom beside the exhibit hall for groups requesting more detail on a particular topic. In this photo one of the educators explains the significance of Galileo’s published observations of the moon.

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